“If increased growth is detrimental to the working environment, it can be costly in the long run. As a manager, it’s important to remember that a good working environment also means that your company will be an attractive place to stay or join,” says stress researcher and business psychologist Malene Friis Andersen.

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Stress researcher: Support overworked employees

Examine your strategy and work routines and talk to your employees, advises stress expert.

Having your hands full with projects, orders and increased production is good, because it means more sales and revenue.

But when extra work puts too much pressure on employees, companies risk ending up in a vicious cycle of sick leave, resignations and poor working environment.

If things start going too fast at the workplace, it is therefore crucial that management steps in, says stress and management researcher Malene Friis Andersen in the wake of a new survey, which shows that many employees feel stressed at companies that have been unable to recruit.

“Stress research tells us that incongruity between demands and resources increases the risk of stress, meaning that if this balance is off, management can either focus on reducing demands or increasing resources. Managers should be inquisitive and ask employees about what they find taxing and what characterises a good work day,” explains Malene Friis Andersen.

See also: Unfilled jobs mean more pressure on Danish employees

She further notes that stress is not only a problem once it’s diagnosed. It takes a toll before, while and after employees fall victim to stress.

Malene Friis Andersen notes that while it is understandable that managers have difficulty putting the brakes on when new orders are pouring in, a good working environment can also help remedy labour shortage.

“If increased growth is detrimental to the working environment, it can be costly in the long run. As a manager, it’s important to remember that a good working environment also means that your company will be an attractive place to stay or to join,” says Malene Friis Andersen.

See also: New figures: 6 out of 10 Danish companies struggle to find employees

FACTS

Malene Friis Andersen

Malene Friis Andersen, PhD and authorised psychologist has worked with stress, job satisfaction, management, social capital and sick leave for over ten years. 

She splits her time between research at The National Research Center for Work Environment and independent practice as a business psychologist at private and public enterprises. 

Anders Just Pedersen

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