“High quality of life and attractive work conditions are some of the parameters that international talents find attractive about Denmark. On the other hand, high cost of living and high taxes are factors that could deter,” says Linda Duncan Wendelboe, Head of DI Global Talent.

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21-11-19 DI Business News

Denmark is the world’s second-best talent developer

Denmark comes in second place in the annual ranking of countries’ ability to attract, develop and retain a talented labour force. Denmark can use its position as a leader in the green transition to appeal even more to young talent, says DI.

Denmark remains among the global elite when it comes to labour force talent and companies’ ability to retain it.

That is the result of the World Talent Ranking, which each year analyses the abilities of 63 countries to attract, develop and invest in its labour force.

For the sixth year running, Denmark comes in second place, following Switzerland. According to Linda Duncan Wendelboe, Head of DI Global Talent, this is because Denmark has good structural conditions for developing and attracting talent.

“It is very positive that we score so highly. It’s also necessary, because highly skilled labour, especially within the STEM field, is in high demand among Danish companies. There is a major potential for bringing Denmark’s strengths into play in the international competition to attract talent, and especially Denmark’s focus on green transition and sustainable development is something that appeals greatly to younger generations,” says Linda Duncan Wendelboe.

In addition to Denmark, also the four other Nordic countries, Norway, Sweden, Iceland and Finland, are among the top 10.

“High quality of life and attractive working conditions are some of the parameters that international talents find attractive about Denmark. On the other hand, high cost of living and high taxes are factors that could deter,” says Linda Duncan Wendelboe.

IMD’s ranking clearly shows that there is room for improvement when it comes to the number of people we educate within the STEM field. Linda Duncan Wendelboe, Chef for DI Global Talent

Education drives development

The ranking is based on 32 variables that together provide a total score. These are gathered into three overall categories: Investment and development, readiness and appeal.

In the category investment and development, Denmark has ranked first since 2016, and this year is no exception.

According to the study, this is closely linked to Denmark’s expenditure on education and the capacity of companies to care for their employees and apprentices.

“But the IMD’s ranking clearly shows that there is room for improvement when it comes to the number of people we educate within the STEM field. It is therefore vital that companies have the opportunity to attract STEM talents from abroad. In general, we must make a targeted effort to ensure that Denmark is an attractive career destination for highly qualified foreign employees and spread awareness of the attractive career opportunities that exist at Danish companies,” says Linda Duncan Wendelboe. 

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Linda Duncan Wendelboe

Head of DI Global Talent

  • Direct +45 3377 3906
  • Mobile +45 9398 8050
  • E-mail lidw@di.dk
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