A new congestion report shows that bus delays in the metropolitan area have increased by 17 percent between 2010 and 2018. Bus lanes can be a way for buses to move around faster.

22-08-19 DI Business News

The bus congestion in Copenhagen costs DKK 2 billion per year

A new congestion report shows that the community loses DKK 2 billion annually because bus passengers in Copenhagen and the metropolitan area are stuck in traffic. Politicians should ensure that buses can move around faster, says DI.

A new congestion report shows that the community loses DKK 2 billion annually because bus passengers in the metropolitan area are stuck in traffic. Politicians should ensure that buses can move around faster, says DI.

Every day, thousands of bus passengers in the metropolitan area are stuck in traffic.  The increasing congestion on the roads also affects the public bus traffic, which in most places runs on the same roads as private cars.

The congestion especially affects the passengers on the busy A-buses.  The socio-economic loss amounts to DKK 2 billion annually, shows a congestion report made by COWI jointly for Movia and the Confederation of Danish Industry (Dansk Industri).

- Bus passengers are delayed by 23,400 hours in total, every day, and we can see that the delays are increasing. If this continues to develop, we risk that more people opt out of public transport, which in turn leads to more congestion on the roads if they drive alone in their car instead. It’s a clear sign for the decision-makers to ensure that the buses can move around a lot faster, says Michael Svane, CEO at DI Transport.

- Movia are working on reducing congestion, making it easier to get to and from work, school and leisure by public transport.  The new congestion analysis shows that the congestion challenge for passengers in the metropolitan area is increasing, but also that investments in bus accessibility may be part of the solution, says Movia's Director of Planning, Per Gellert.

See also: Four out of ten Danes want a greener car

The congestion is increasing

Between 2010 and 2018, the congestion for buses in the metropolitan area has increased by 17 percent.  


Equivalently, the Danish Road Directorate announced in March 2019 that car congestion has increased by 25 percent between 2010 and 2016. The congestion has especially increased in central Copenhagen, where the A-buses are stuck in traffic daily.

The congestion report also shows that the bus congestion is relatively low on lines 150S and 5C, where the Municipality of Copenhagen, with subsidies from the state, has made it easier for the buses to drive.

On line 150S, the buses have their own lane on the stretch from the lakes to Haraldsgade.  

On line 5C, the Municipality of Copenhagen has improved the buses' ability to get through traffic on Frederikssundsvej, and Nørrebrogade has been equipped with  a bus street so that fewer cars pass through. The bus stops have been upgraded on both these lines, making it easier to get in and out, and the buses have first priority in a number of traffic lights. This means that buses can get through traffic a lot faster and also get past queues.

The sharp increase in congestion in central Copenhagen shows that Cityringen—which opens later this year—is a necessary improvement in public transport. Cityringen replaces parts of the trip on a number of bus lines and it will be an advantage for passengers, since it’s faster to travel under ground than above ground. 

When Cityringen opens, the A-buses will be driving new routes, bringing passengers to the stations where it is possible to change to the metro and train.

FaCTS

The congestion report

         Based on 1.7 million measurements from Movia’s counting buses.

         Based, respectively, on data from January and March in 2010 and 2018.

         Covers the old HUR area (similar to the metropolitan area)

         Specifically shows the following:

o    Bus delays in the metropolitan area increase by 17 percent between 2010 and 2018

o    The congestion is measured on three levels (insignificant, great and critical congestion), and there is a particular increase in the critical congestion—situations in which the traffic is almost at a standstill.

o    The biggest increase in congestion is seen on A-buses in Copenhagen, where passengers overall experience an increased delay of 50 percent.

Michael Svane

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  • E-mail misv@di.dk
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