Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen wants to cooperate closely with Danish companies to solve climate issues and reach the target of a 70 per cent reduction in carbon emissions by 2030.

Foto: Thomas Arnbo
18-09-19 DI Business News

Mette Frederiksen invites companies to sign climate contracts

It’s time to put real deals on the table. Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen wants to sign new climate contracts with the biggest sectors in Danish business in order to reach climate targets.

It’s time to put real deals on the table. Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen wants to sign new climate contracts with the biggest sectors in Danish business in order to reach climate targets.

Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen (Socialdemokratiet) wants to collaborate with Danish companies in order to reach the government’s target of a 70 per cent cut in carbon emissions by 2030. At the DI Business Summit 2019, she extended a direct invitation to Danish companies to sign so-called climate contracts, in which politicians and companies commit to the green transition.

“My hope is that my invitation will enable us to put together a green action plan, sector by sector. Talking in general terms isn’t enough. Instead, we need to delve into all major sectors that have helped carry our country forwards,” said Mette Frederiksen.

As examples, she mentioned process industries, transport, agriculture, food, fashion and gaming industries as well as trade and tourism.

You’ve requested more money for green research. And you’re going to get it - around double the amount. PM Mette Frederiksen (S)

Companies and organisations are therefore invited to the prime minister’s residence at Marienborg as soon as possible to discuss how climate contracts can be drawn up.

She described the contracts as elements of the action plans the government intends to launch when a climate law is passed, which she is seeking to have in place before Christmas.

See also: DI launches new 2030-plan: We can create growth and cut Denmark’s emissions by up to 70 per cent

Clearing the way

Mette Frederiksen described the climate contracts as the next major step in the government’s green agenda - a next step that follows the Confederation of Danish Industry’s 2030 Plan “Together we create green growth”, which the prime minister described as a giant leap.

As part of the climate contract, companies must also let the government know if they come up against difficulties with authorities and politicians.

“If you run into obstacles - ineffective legislation, unnecessary bureaucracy or politicians who haven’t understood how things work - then let us know, and we’ll clear the way,” said Mette Frederiksen.

See also: Youth at democracy festival: “Companies must take the lead to achieve SDGs”

DI: Crystal clear call for cooperation

DI’s CEO Lars Sandahl Sørensen welcomes Mette Frederiksen’s invitation.

“The prime minister’s invitation to sign climate contracts is a crystal clear signal that the green transition is something we can only achieve together. DI and Danish companies are prepared to work together to figure out how we can find the right solutions to climate change which will also secure Denmark’s competitiveness and prosperity,” says CEO Lars Sandahl Sørensen.

He emphasises that the target of a 70 per cent reduction by 2030 is extremely ambitious - and can only be reached by investing in green research and developing new solutions.

“With DI’s 2030 Plan, we’re presenting our proposal for how we can get closer to that target. But there are also many answers and green solutions that are yet unknown - both within various sectors and across sectors and society as a whole,” says Lars Sandahl Sørensen.

See also: DI: New technological achievement with Horns Rev 3

More research and export support

And precisely in the field of research, Mette Frederiksen pledged action - specifically in the form of a doubling of funding for green research.

“You’ve requested more money for green research. And you’re going to get it - around double the amount we currently spend, which means we’ll go from DKK 1 billion to DKK 2 billion,” said Mette Frederiksen.

In addition, she promised help to strengthen Danish companies’ green exports to new markets. European exports are going relatively well.

“But when you venture out into new markets, it starts to get difficult. That is why we in our proposal for the Finance Act intend to make it easier to export green solutions around the world.”

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Written by:

Uffe Hansen